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April 2024
Tuesday, 16 April 2024 00:00

Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, is a condition where the arteries that supply blood to the legs and feet become narrowed or blocked due to plaque buildup. This decreases blood flow to the lower extremities. Symptoms of PAD can vary but often include leg pain or cramping while walking or climbing stairs, which typically eases with rest. Some people may also experience numbness, weakness, or a cold sensation in their lower legs or feet. Changes in the color of the skin or slower growth of the nails may also occur. In more severe cases, PAD can lead to wounds or ulcers on the feet or legs that heal poorly or not at all. Getting diagnosed early is important because PAD can be a sign of more widespread arterial disease, which could increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. Early treatment can help manage symptoms, improve mobility, and reduce the risk of more serious complications. It is suggested that you consult a podiatrist, or foot doctor, for help if you are experiencing any symptoms that sound like PAD. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Steven Shlonsky from Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Shlonsky will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Louisville, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Wednesday, 10 April 2024 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Published in Blog

Ensuring proper shoe fit goes a long way in preventing heel pain, where both support and comfort play pivotal roles. Wearing ill-fitting shoes, particularly high heels, and narrow styles, exacerbate heel discomfort by placing excessive pressure on the heel and altering natural foot mechanics. During the pandemic, the widespread adoption of unsupportive footwear like slippers and flip-flops further contributed to foot problems, as they lacked adequate arch support and cushioning. As individuals age, foot structures change, making them more susceptible to heel pain. Therefore, it is imperative to prioritize footwear that offers ample support and cushioning to alleviate strain on the heels and promote proper alignment. Opting for shoes with a wide-toe box, cushioned insoles, and low to moderate heels can help distribute weight evenly and reduce heel pain. If you suffer from persistent heel pain, it is strongly suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can diagnose the cause and offer guidance on the best shoes to wear for your particular needs and circumstances.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Steven Shlonsky of Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Shlonsky can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Louisville, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 02 April 2024 00:00

Foot Corns

Corns on the feet, medically termed keratotic lesions, are areas of thickened skin caused by repeated friction or pressure. They commonly occur on weight-bearing areas like the toes and soles of the feet. Symptoms can include localized pain or tenderness, a hardened or raised bump, and sometimes inflammation or redness. Older individuals are more prone to developing corns due to factors like reduced skin elasticity and altered foot mechanics. There are three main types of corns. Hard corns are small, dense, and are usually found on bony areas. Soft corns are moist and typically form between toes where the skin is moist. Seed corns are tiny and appear on non-weight-bearing areas. Diagnosis is typically made based on clinical examination. Management involves relieving pressure on the affected area, wearing properly fitting footwear, using protective pads or cushions, and sometimes, having the corn removed. If you have persistent or painful corns, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for treatment.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Steven Shlonsky of Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Shlonsky will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Louisville, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them
Published in Blog